iLAB
 
Going forward, the Stony Brook Proteomics Center will start to use a new online submission process, in collaboration with iLab, to streamline the process of requesting services as well as billing. We urge everybody to submit their requests through the online system, preferentially before submitting the samples. Even better, please contact a Proteomics Center member before starting an experiment to make sure that your sample is in a state ready for analysis.
 
For Stony Brook University users:
Navigate to the core page: Core Facilities at Stony Brook University
Login as StonyBrook user and use your NetID and NetID password.
Click on "List all Cores" on the left panel to view the cores at Stony Brook Medicine currently using the software
Click on "Stony Brook Proteomics Center"
The core site is made of up five tabs:
About Our Core provides information about the facility,
Request Services provides a location to request projects and services,
View My Request allows you to view all your current and past service requests for that core
Contact Us provides an email interface to email the core directly.
 
For External Users:
To get started, you must register for an account:
Navigate to the core page: Core Facilities at Stony Brook University
1. All external users must register for an iLab account prior to logging in to request services from Stony Brook Medicine cores. If you do not have an iLab account, you must register for an account by clicking on the "register" link on the first login page.
2. You are taken to the registration screen. To register, please complete all the fields and submit to iLab support. You will receive login credentials within on business day.
a. If you are not a P.I., your P.I. will be automatically registered when you list him/her.
b. Financial Administrator is the person in charge of payments for the P.I. eg. lab manager and/or P.I.
4. You will receive a "welcome" email from iLab (typically within one business day) with login credentials and basic instructions.
Note: Emails from iLab may state "iLab Support" or "do-not-reply" as the Sender.
5. Once logged in, click on the "view all cores" link on the left panel to review the list of core facilities at Stony Brook Medicine. Click on the core name to enter the core facility site to request a service.
6. The core site is made of up five tabs:
About Our Core provides information about the facility,
Request Services provides a location to request projects and services,
View My Request allows you to view all your current and past service requests for that core
Contact Us provides an email interface to email the core directly.
 
To Create a Service Request:
1. Click the 'Request Services' tab. We have three Project request forms (Protein/Peptide; Small Molecule; DNA/other), depending on the type of sample. Please choose the one relevant to your sample and click on the 'Initiate Request' button next to the service of interest.
2. You will be asked to answer a few questions about the sample which will help the Proteomics Center to determine the type of services and the relevant charges to complete your request. If you can, please provide payment information for your request before submitting the request to the core.
3. Your request will be pending review by the core. The core will add charges and submit it back to you for approval. Make sure to watch for an email from iLab regarding your updated project.
4. User will receive an automated iLab email to approve a price quote after the Core reviews the request. Follow email instructions.
 
Additional help
If you need help, please do not hesitate to contact the Proteomics Center. We are happy to help you with registration and the service requests.
More detailed instructions are available in the customer manual. For any questions not addressed in the manual, click on the "leave iLab feedback" link in the upper right hand corner or contact support@ilabsolutions.com.
 
Description of Stony Brook Proteomics Center
The Proteomics Center at Stony Brook (formerly the Center for the Analysis and Synthesis of Macromolecules, CASM) was established in the Health Sciences Center at the University at Stony Brook in 1985 with a Shared Instrumentation Grant from the National Institutes of Health. The Proteomics Core Facility at Stony Brook University School of Medicine supports basic and clinical research programs by performing mass spectrometry-based analyses of proteins and peptides. The facility offers state-of-the-art instrumentation and software for qualitative (e.g. protein identification), quantitative proteomics analysis (e.g. relative quantification), and post-translational modification (PTM) analysis. The Proteomics Center also supports small molecule analysis. We offer services of sample preparation, LC-MS/MS analysis, statistical analysis, and data mining for large-scale proteomic projects. Center directors are available to provide expert consultation on experimental approaches and design.
 
The Core provides the following services (see Services & Experiments page for detail description of each service):

Mass Spectrometry-based proteomic analyses:

Shotgun proteomics analysis for protein identification
1D LC-MS/MS and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT)
Intact protein analysis by MALDI
Relative & absolute protein quantification (15N SILAM, SILAC, iTRAQ, TMT, label-free, etc.)
Post-translational modification (PTM) analysis

Small molecule and DNA analysis

Check out the newest papers containing data produced in the Proteomics Center:

Lee KW, Okot-Kotber C, Lacomb JF, Bogenhagen DF. 2013. Mitochondrial rRNA Methyltransferase Family Members are Positioned to Modify Nascent rRNA in Foci Near the mtDNA Nucleoid. J Biol Chem. in press.
 
Escobar-Hoyos LF, Yang J, Zhu J, Cavallo JA, Zhai H, Burke S, Koller A, Chen EI, Shroyer KR. 2013. Keratin 17 in premalignant and malignant squamous lesions of the cervix: proteomic discovery and immunohistochemical validation as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker. Mod Pathol. in press.
 
Camenares D, Dulebohn DP, Svetlanov A, Karzai AW. 2013. Active and Accurate trans-Translation Requires Distinct Determinants in the C-Terminal Tail of SmpB and the mRNA-Like Domain of tmRNA. J Biol Chem. in press.
 
Sampath V, Liu B, Tafrov S, Srinivasan M, Rieger R, Chen EI, Sternglanz R. 2013. Biochemical characterization of Hpa2 and Hpa3 - two small closely related acetyltransferases from S. cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 288:21506-13.
 
Wang L, Zeng X, Chen S, Ding L, Zhong J, Zhao JC, Wang L, Sarver A, Koller A, Zhi J, Ma Y, Yu J, Chen J, Huang H. 2013. BRCA1 is a negative modulator of the PRC2 complex. Embo J., 32-1584-1597.
 
Koller A, Wen R, Wu X, Relucio J, Colognato H, Chen EI. 2013. Performing quantitative Proteomics using the 15N Silac Mice. Journal of Proteomics & Genomics Research, 1:27-39.
 
Ghajar CM, Peinado H, Mori H, Mater IR, Brazier H, Koller A, Chen EI, Lyden DC, Bissell MJ. 2013. The Perivascular niche regulates breast tumor dormancy. Nature Cell Biology, 15:807-817.